George has been working on how thermal imaging can help to determine how close an animal is to giving birth. As any farmer will tell you it is always the animal you least expect that will give calf next, the ones you are watching are normally the last. As we own some expensive pedigree cattle and George also calves a lot of two year old maiden heifers every year the information he has gathered is proving to be very valuable.

He has found that by using a combination of body temperature,  vulva temperature and the thermal image itself he can now accurately predict to within a couple of hours who is going to calve next. This then allows him to either keep a closer eye on the animal or use a Moocall calving detection aid if need be. This has proved to be very valuable and has helped to save lives. It also means that we do not have the expense of having to operate lots of Moocall devices as we can utilise the one we have more efficiently, it also means that Moocall is not attached to the animals tail for long periods of time reducing the risk of damaging their tails.  


This cow had calved 3 hours after this photo.
This cow had calved 3 hours after this photo.
This group photo clearly shows the cow on the left is closer to calving than the other two. They all look at about the same stage by eye.
This group photo clearly shows the cow on the left is closer to calving than the other two. They all look at about the same stage by eye.